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Luke Gorrie

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Europe, Switzerland, OLPC, Boston, Canada, etc [Sep. 7th, 2009|10:11 pm]
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I've been busy: briefly catching up with lots of friends around Europe, clearing Swiss immigration, exploring Switzerland by bike and by foot, working with Mitch on the OLPC-1.5 rev-A2/B1 firmware, meeting interesting people in Boston, going to a great wedding in Canada, and so on.

The highlight has been a quick cycle tour from near Zürich (Pfäffikon) through Davos and Flüela Pass to Vulpera near the Austrian/Italian borders. Hiked some beautiful mountains, picked lots of wild berries, and got introduced to Kaiserschmarrn at a friendly alp.

I'm extremely happy with my new touring setup: a Specialized road bike, a Deuter Superbike backpack, a waterproof sleeping bag from REI ("just add forest" one-piece camping kit), and bugger all else. France, Germany, Austria, Italy: I'll ride to you soon :-)

Current agenda: ECLM on the weekend and then finding a more permanent home than Juho's couch in Zürich.

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[User Picture]From: lukego
2009-09-16 04:20 pm (UTC)

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Lisp hackers do know about Erlang and often borrow ideas from it. See for example the Butterfly slides from another ECLM talk, or earlier Erlang-emulation libraries like CL-MUPROC. They seem to have an easy time with message-passing, pattern matching, and distribution. Light-weight isolated processes seem too hard in Lisp though, so you can safely stick with Erlang :-)

The ticket reservation system does sound like an extremely good match for Erlang. ITA is a very established Lisp shop of 10+ years and 50+ hackers though . They have an interesting history of success with Lisp. I'm sure they know about Erlang but I don't expect they could switch even if they wanted to.

btw: Dan Weinreb (the speaker) was a founder of Symbolics and he wrote Lisp Machine Emacs. Like I say, history. :-)